The first accounts from on-board at the end of the Jules Verne Trophy attempt

The first accounts from on-board at the end of the Jules Verne Trophy attempt

 

After setting sail from Ushant on 10 January 2021, the crew of the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild put an end to its Jules Verne Trophy record attempt this Friday 22 January after twelve intense days at sea, a journey which proved to have a steep learning curve. It is with a great deal of disappointment and inevitably a few regrets that this circumnavigation of the globe draws to a close. Justified disappointment because, given how much effort the six sailors put into this first section of the planetary course, they were deserving of so much more. Regrets too as Franck Cammas, Charles Caudrelier and their four crew proved that they were right on the pace on this magnificent descent of the Atlantic, added to which the weather forecasts for the coming days were smiling on them… Alas, the story is not theirs to write this year, but this experience is far from over, as one of the co-skippers of the 32-metre giant, Charles Caudrelier, speculated.

Jules Verne Trophy Info 

 

Numbers to note:  

Passage across the line: 10 January 2021 at 01h 33′ 46” UTC  

Passage of the equator: 15 January 2021 at 14h 48’ 32’’ UTC, in 5 days 13 hours 14 minutes and 46 seconds

Passage of the Cape of Good Hope: 21 January 2021 at 11h27’46’’ UTC, in 11 days 9 hours and 53 minutes (new reference time)
Passage of Cape Agulhas: 21 January 2021 at 15h37’53’’ UTC, in 11 days 14 hours and 03 minutes (new reference time)

Crew of the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild:  

Franck Cammas and Charles Caudrelier, skippers  
David Boileau, trimmer bowman  
Erwan Israël, helm trimmer  
Morgan Lagravière, helm trimmer  
Yann Riou, trimmer media man   

Marcel van Triest, weather router  
Yann Eliès, replacement crew