Didac Costa already sails in the Indian ocean

The One Planet One Ocean crossed the Good Hope meridian on Tuesday, the first of the three mythical southern capes that mark the circumnavigation of the planet. Didac Costa is the third time he has done it, all in the last five years after participating in the Barcelona World Race (2015) and the Vendée Globe (2016), and always on board the same boat, the legendary Kingfisher built for Ellen MacArthur in New Zealand more than 20 years ago.

The Catalan has spent 29 days, 20 hours and 57 minutes to cut the meridian 18º 28’19’E of the geographical landmark, which also determines the separation between the Atlantic and Indian oceans. Costa has been the 21st participant in this ninth Vendée Globe to do so, 7 days and 11 hours after leader Charlie Dalin (Apivia), just 16 hours and 5 minutes behind predecessor Manuel Cousin (Groupe Sétin). His pursuer Pip Hare (Medallia) did it 1 hour and 45 minutes after the Spanish. Until this geographical milestone, Costa has sailed 8,021.6 nautical miles since the start, with an average speed of 11.2 knots

The Barcelona sailor is immersed in an interesting duel with the British Pip Hare, who competes with his Medallia, a boat of the same vintage as the One Planet One Ocean. Yesterday, 12 miles separated the two, while today at 3:00 p.m. Costa increased its advantage to 24 miles, contesting the nineteenth position of the classification. But if the boats are old acquaintances from the Vendée Globe 2000-2001, Hare and Costa are also old acquaintances, since both raced successfully in the Mini Transat, where only 40 minutes separated them in the final classification. Its proximity made Didac Costa alert Pip Hare when he collided with a whale the day before yesterday, in case it caused him some serious damage and helped him, as she navigated a few miles by his stern.